Endoscopy Staff Injury: A Personal Story

Posted by Larissa Biggers on December 14, 2018

Meet Cathy

She’s an endoscopy technician with over 30 years of experience. She loves her job, but not the pain and injuries that come along with it.

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Topics: colonoscopy, nurse injury, difficult colonoscopy, abdominal pressure colonoscopy, endoscopy nursing, safe patient handling, patient, nursing, endoscopy, nurse

A Brief History of Colonoscopy

Posted by Larissa Biggers on November 30, 2018
 
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Topics: colorectal cancer, CRC, colonoscopy, screening, cecal intubation time, gastroenterologist, GI nursing, endoscopy, ADR, endoscopist

Increasing Endoscopy Unit Efficiency: It’s Time to Take Control

Posted by Larissa Biggers on November 16, 2018

Waiting is hating

Americans hate to wait, whether it’s for food, Internet connectivity, or a green light. So it should come as no surprise that the more time patients spend waiting to see a physician, the more dissatisfied they are. What might be surprising is that longer wait times have a negative impact on other, potentially more consequential aspects of the patient experience, specifically patients’ confidence in their physician and how they perceive their quality of care.

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Topics: colorectal cancer, CRC, colonoscopy, screening, ColoWrap, cecal intubation time, patient experience, hospital costs, tortuous colon, gastroenterologist, endoscopy nursing, GI nursing, endoscopist, looping in colonoscopy, healthcare costs, difficult colonoscopy, endoscopy

Injury in Endoscopists: Scope at Your Own Risk

Posted by Larissa Biggers on August 31, 2018

The safety and comfort of patients undergoing colonoscopy is of paramount importance to hospitals, providers, and of course, the patients themselves. But what about the physicians performing the procedure? It might be news to those outside the field, but gastroenterologists are commonly injured on the job. A review of current literature found that musculoskeletal complaints are extremely common among GIs; the incidence of pain and injuries ranges from 29% up to 89%. Another study indicated that 45% of endoscopists undergo physical therapy to combat pain, 26.8% get steroid injections, and 13.3% require surgery.

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Topics: colonoscopy, difficult colonoscopy, endoscopist, gastroenterologist, tortuous colon, colorectal cancer, CRC, looping in colonoscopy, endoscopy, colon cancer, injury endoscopist, GI injury

Does FIT Measure Up to Colonoscopy?

Posted by Larissa Biggers on June 28, 2018

 

Does FIT Measure up to Colonoscopy?

How do fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) stack up to colonoscopy, the gold standard for colon cancer screening? Admittedly, FIT might sound pretty good—no special diet, no colonoscopy prep, no hospital gown. But everything that shines is not gold.

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Topics: endoscopy, patient, colonoscopy, colon cancer, FIT, screening, adenoma, polyp

Nurse Endoscopists: Faster, Cheaper, Better?

Posted by Larissa Biggers on June 22, 2018

 

In terms of quality, safety, and patient satisfaction, screening colonoscopies performed by nurse practitioners (NPs) are equivalent to those of physicians, according to the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Given proper training, NPs could improve the sub-par colorectal cancer screening compliance rates in the United States with procedures that cost less and are equally safe and effective.

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Topics: endoscopy, nurse, nursing, patient, colonoscopy, colon cancer

VA Leads the Way in Safety

Posted by Larissa Biggers on June 15, 2018

 

There’s a saying about nurses: Save one life, you’re a hero. Save 100, and you’re a nurse. Nurses are a dedicated bunch, routinely sacrificing their safety for that of their patients. Most have impacted thousands of lives.

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Topics: endoscopy, nurse, nursing, patient, VA, Veteran

Endoscopy Nurses: How Much Are They Worth?

Posted by Larissa Biggers on June 08, 2018

 

Have you heard? The American Cancer Society’s new screening guidelines for colorectal cancer recommend starting screening at age 45 instead of 50. That’s great news for Americans worried about the increased risk of colorectal cancer in young adults. But maybe not for endoscopy nurses, who are already in short supply.

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Topics: colonoscopy, colon cancer, endoscopy, nurse, nursing

This blog is designed to discuss key topics in colonoscopy. 

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